compost bin

Constructing our first compost pile at the farm from pallets

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If there’s one thing that gardening produces a lot of, it’s green waste that needs composting. So while we have a small compost bin for the farm’s kitchen scraps, a proper compost pile is needed for the garden, even at this early stage.

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There’s no shortage of free pallets from the local retailers in Nowra

One of the easiest ways to create something fairly solid is to assemble a compost bay from pallets. What’s nice is that pallets are a free resource (the unbranded ones that is), which can be obtained (with permission!) from the loading bays of many shops.

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One of the back corners of the compost bay, screwed together and lined

The pallets are quite easy to screw together, to create a bay that’s two pallets wide, and two deep. Cover the inside of the pallets with shade cloth (or equivalent) to stop the compost falling out.

A half-size front makes it easier to add to the pile, and this is just wired on, allowing it to be easily removed when the compost needs turning (or harvesting!).

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The completed compost bay, already half full with garden waste

We’re only a few months into our farm adventure, and already we have a good-sized pile that should be ready by spring or summer. Happy days.

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A new home for the compost bin … and the chickens make their mark

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Making a concrete pad for the compost bin to sit on.

We’ve now finished the clean-up of the backyard, and have started to plant out a native garden (more on this in a future post). With the left-over bricks (etc) out of the way, it was time to move our 2nd Aerobin into it’s final location on the fence.

Last year, the rats ate a hole through the thick plastic base of our other Aerobin, and dug themselves a nest in the nice warm compost. Never again! So this compost bin gets a small but solid concrete base.

This took a couple of hours to do, and took six bags of concrete. As a DIY job, it’s not the best example of concreting, but it’s hidden under the compost bin.

Now, finishing concreting normally sees one’s cat or dog walk across the wet surface. Not in our case, it was the chickens who made their mark:

The chickens make their mark on my concrete base.

The aim is to grow up a dense screen of natives around the compost bin, and its green colour should help 🙂

The compost bin in its final position on the concrete base, against the side fence.