choko

Weedy resources from the Department of Agriculture

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Whether you’re in the city or the country, you have to wage a constant war on weeds. Many are hard to kill, some are poisonous.

Others, however, are hard to identify. And if you don’t know what it is, how do you know whether to pull it out (and how)?

When down at the recent Small Farm Field Day, I visited the stand manned by the Department of Agriculture. They pointed me to an excellent phone app, called NSW WeedWise.

This contains a comprehensive collection of weeds, including photos and descriptions. It also indicates how serious a weed is, and whether you’re required to destroy it.

A lot of the weeds I already knew about, but I was pleased to learn about Moth vine. This looks quite like choko, and it’s growing on the back fence of the convent.

Far from being edible, however, it has sap that’s poisonous, and it spreads itself liberally when the seed pod bursts open.

Another day, another weed. Download the app from the Apple Store or Google Play.

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One of the many weeds listed in the NSW WeedWise app.

Pumpkin and choko dauphinoise

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Sliced ingredients, ready for the baking dish
Sliced ingredients, ready for the baking dish

In another of our series of choko recipes, this is a variation on the classic potato dauphinoise, only with pumpkin, choko and radishes.

The method is simple:

Slice the ingredients thinly, using a mandolin or knife.

Layering up the vegetables
Layering up the vegetables

Then layer the vegetables in a small, high-sided baking dish. Alternate the ingredients, adding small knobs of butter as you go. I also added some dried sage (home-made of course!), salt and pepper.

Then pour in cream, to come up the level of the vegetables.

Bake in a 180°C oven for 45mins. I then added a layer of grated cheese (why not!), and baked until golden brown.

Delicious!
Delicious!

The result was delicious with pork sausages and peas 🙂

Sauteed choko with tarragon

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As posted earlier, we have a lot of choko, kilos worth. Thankfully we’ve discovered that it’s actually delightful, not the horrible make-do vegetable of reputation.

To demonstrate this, I’ll share a few recipes that we’ve used to get the most of choko, starting with sauteed choko.

Sauteed choko, delicious with sausages.
Sauteed choko, delicious with sausages.

Sauteed choko with tarragon

Cut the choko into thin “chips”, discarding the outside skin if tough.

Heat up olive oil in a frying pan, with some butter.

When the oil and butter starts to foam, add the choko, along with a sprinkling of dried tarragon.

Toss in the oil, and cook until the choko is tender, when tested with the point of a knife.

Add salt and pepper to taste, and serve!

This works wonderfully alongside meat, such as a steak or sausages. Yum!

 

A giant windfall of choko

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That's a lot of chokos!
That’s a lot of chokos!

This is what 22kg of chokos look like, 56 fruit in total.

Two days ago, we had a day of very strong wind as a cold front went through. This dislodged the ripe fruit in our choko vine that had grown all the way up into the trees. A single vine, that is, and there’s still fruit on it!

I needed to get a left-over grain bag to collect them all, and a bunch of them had cracked when the landed on the convent driveway next door. No matter, we’re steaming the broken ones to feed to the chickens, which they love!

The rest we’re eating. Expect to see a bunch of choko recipes posted to the blog over the coming weeks… 😉