aerobin

Reworking our Aerobins

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One of our two Aerobins, alongside our worm farm
One of our two Aerobins, alongside our worm farm

At present, we have three Aerobins and one worm farm. The thing that makes the Aerobins special is the  patented lung ® or aeration core inside. This is a series of connected pieces that provides greater levels of circulation, and therefore faster decomposition.

The pieces of the Aerobin "lung", mangled through use.
The pieces of the Aerobin “lung”, mangled through use.

 

At least, that’s the theory. In practice, the pieces often get mangled when turning over the contents of the Aerobin, and several of my hat-like structures have been damaged beyond use. I know I’m not the only one to experience this.

A replacement aeration method, made of out 90mm pipe
A replacement aeration method, made of out 90mm pipe

Taking a suggestion from my dad, I emptied out each of the Aerobins, and removed the aeration core pieces. To replace this, I drilled holes in a length of 90mm polypipe, adding a cap on the end. (These are standard plumbing items that can be obtained from the nearest hardware or plumbing store.)

The result is a more robust source of air circulation, that should be resilient against day-to-day use. Touch wood, it should still give me the faster aerobic breakdown of compost.

The Aerobin refilled, with its new home-made air spike
The Aerobin refilled, with its new home-made air spike

A new home for the compost bin … and the chickens make their mark

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Making a concrete pad for the compost bin to sit on.

We’ve now finished the clean-up of the backyard, and have started to plant out a native garden (more on this in a future post). With the left-over bricks (etc) out of the way, it was time to move our 2nd Aerobin into it’s final location on the fence.

Last year, the rats ate a hole through the thick plastic base of our other Aerobin, and dug themselves a nest in the nice warm compost. Never again! So this compost bin gets a small but solid concrete base.

This took a couple of hours to do, and took six bags of concrete. As a DIY job, it’s not the best example of concreting, but it’s hidden under the compost bin.

Now, finishing concreting normally sees one’s cat or dog walk across the wet surface. Not in our case, it was the chickens who made their mark:

The chickens make their mark on my concrete base.

The aim is to grow up a dense screen of natives around the compost bin, and its green colour should help 🙂

The compost bin in its final position on the concrete base, against the side fence.